The 56 GPS stations in GNET are placed along the Greenlandic inland ice. Photo: Shfaqat Abbas Khan

Greenland GPS Network (GNET)

56 GPS stations are distributed along the Greenland inland ice. Together they make up the Greenland GPS Network (GNET). The stations measure elevation changes in the Earth’s crust.

GNET measures elevation changes in the Earth’s crust. The changes show whether the ice sheet mass becomes larger or smaller. The more the Earth’s crust contracts, the more ice there is. And vice versa: The more the Earth’s crust rises, the less ice there is.

There is a natural variation in the height of the crust depending on seasonal changes. In the wintertime the crust is more compressed because the mass of the inland ice is bigger than during summertime.

GNET monitors variations across several years

GNET give the researches the opportunity to monitor the variations in the Earth’s crust over a period of several years because the stations are permanent. The measurements make it possible to determine whether there is a net melting of the ice cap or not. Put in another way, the measurements make it possible to detect if ice that melts during summertime does not appear again the following winter.

GNET is operated by DTU Space in cooperation with the American National Science Foundation, Ohio State University and the non-profit university-governed consortium UNAVCO.

The map below shows the locations of the 56 GNET stations.

The map shows the positions of the 56 GNET stations. Illustration: Michael Bevis.

Contact

Finn Bo Madsen
Section Head
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 84

Contact

Shfaqat Abbas Khan
Associate Professor
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 75

Contact

Per Knudsen
Professor, Head of Geodesy
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 18